Registration for the 22-23 school year begins on July 1, 2022!

One last chance to catch GMSD's Quarter 4 Parent Workshop (On-Demand): The Emotional Effects of Social Media

Germantown, Tennessee-May 24, 2022--Social media is proven to increase anxiety and depression, yet 92% of all teens have social media accounts and 45% say it’s the primary way they connect to peers. Learn why the adolescent brain is more reactive to social media and how dopamine causes addictive behaviors that impair the lives of today’s teenagers. Counselors will leave with effective strategies to help teens make better choices, manage their time, and connect with peers in positive ways.  Join national expert, Allison Edwards, LPC, for this virtual parent seminar (on demand).  This video will be available until June 4, 2022.

 

Allison Edwards LPC, RPT is an affiliate professor in the Human Development Counseling department at Vanderbilt University. She is the author of Why Smart Kids Worry, Worry Says What?, Marcy Is Having All the Feels, 15-Minute Counseling Techniques that Work, and Flooded: A Brain-Based Guide to Help Children Regulate Emotions, and How To Crack Your Peanut. Allison received her graduate degree in Counseling from Vanderbilt University and is a National Certified Counselor, Licensed Professional Counselor, and Registered Play Therapist. Allison has over 20 years experience working as a school teacher, school counselor, child/adolescent psychotherapist, and educational consultant to schools throughout the country. Allison travels both nationally and internationally training professionals in the areas of empowering anxious children in the classroom, managing the emotional needs of students, recognizing the social/emotional needs of gifted students, and sharing how educators can talk to parents about student anxiety. Allison helps school leaders understand how social/emotional differences can be supported in their neurologically diverse student populations, and provides consultation and staff development on how to effectively improve emotion regulation in the classroom.